Landmine Marathon

Posted: March 5th, 2009

"We definitely consider ourselves a death metal band first and foremost."

Interview by Sam Hitz

Hailing from Phoenix, AZ, Landmine Marathon’s on the verge of infecting the world with their metallic disease. Showing symptoms of early death traditions and a black-plagued throat (provided by vocalist Grace Perry), the band’s incubated into a metal epidemic. With no antidote in sight, LM will continue to spread until we’re all contaminated.

What’s it like to have a hot chick fronting the band? Wait, lemme rephrase that: What’s it like to have a voice as gnarled as that firing from a hot chick fronting the band? It’s some of the hardest female death metal vocals I’ve come across.
Matt Martinez: When we first heard Grace sing we knew we wanted to be in a band with her. It had nothing to do with her gender and everything to do with her abilities as a vocalist and front person. Simply put, she’s amazing and there is no one like her.

Grace, what does your whole job entail?
Grace Perry: As the lead singer, I have it pretty easy. Mainly I focus on writing lyrics but I’ll always put in my two cents about song structure. When it gets time to record, building concepts for an album and making sure my lyrics are always something that I want representing the band can be nerve-wracking. As for shows, I’m usually in charge of all the merch, all the drinking, and making sure Landmine puts on a performance that will melt faces. Really, my job doesn’t get too hard. It’s definitely more of a blast than work.

I hear a big trace of Bolt Thrower on the split with Scarecrow, especially in the guitars on “Skin From Skull.” I mentioned death metal before. Do you refer to yourselves as a death metal band?
MM: Our roots are in metal, hardcore, and punk. We definitely consider ourselves a death metal band first and foremost. We’re all fans of Bolt Thrower, the early days of Earache records, death metal and thrash.

How long ago was Landmine Marathon just an idea? Is what we hear now the original lineup? MM: We started the band in late 2004. 
Grace, me, and Mike are all original members. We’ve lost a few guitarists in those years—some due to personality clashes, to say the least, and some due to other life commitments taking priority. This is one of the most solid and dedicated lineups we’ve had.

What’s your favorite part of the country to bring your metal to?
MM: One of our favorite places we’ve played is Precious Metal in NYC, which is an awesome party that our friend Curran puts on. Any warehouse or living room in Oakland—any warehouse, living room, or party anywhere.

Grace, who are your top five sickest punk or metal female singers?
GP: In no particular order: Lita Ford, Candace from Walls of Jericho, Wendy O Williams, Gina from The Orsa, and Angela from Arch Enemy.

Say you could play with Bolt Thrower and Arch Enemy in Iraq. Would you do it?
MM: It would be awesome to play with Bolt Thrower in a war-infested environment as a backdrop to their war-obsessed themes—let alone playing with Bolt Thrower anywhere. Also, Arch Enemy would have to open! Would it be one of those USO tours? That would be horrible, because you know Godsmack or Drowning Pool would be on the bill bringing their aggro-rock to the desert.

What would your own metalfest be called? What bands would you list?
MM: It would be called the Boner City Massacre. It would take place in Death Valley and the lineup would be a mix of bands we love and bands that we love and are friends with: Bolt Thrower, Morbid Angel, Napalm Death, Gorefest, Pig Destroyer, Rotten Sound, Electric Wizard, Tragedy, Doomriders, Saviours, Graf Orlock, and Phobia.

Would you burn down the Palo Verde if I gave you a hundred bucks?
MM: Dude, we couldn’t accept payment, we’d be doing a service. But seriously, the environmental effects would be brutal if that place caught fire. They don’t call it the Dirty Verde for nothing.

Anyone to thank, desecrate, or humiliate?
MM: We owe a ton of thanks to Longmont Potion Castle for keeping us company on many long rides across the country.


Listen to Landmine Marathon here or check their myspace for upcoming shows.

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