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Author Topic: Warm-ups for skateboarding  (Read 5872 times)
GC
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« on: July 28, 2013, 11:28:02 AM »

Sometimes I see people roll up to the park or the spot and "warm up" by doing static quad and hamstring stretches. I just want to stooge-slap them. Do we extend our quads and hamstrings when we stretch? Does skateboarding require particular flexibility of these muscles? With the exception of a stiffy or a method air, no! Also, static stretching cools the muscles being stretched -- the very ones we want to be activating! Doing so reduces coordination, induces fatigue, and DOES NOT PREVENT INJURY. It actually makes a person more likely to be injured.

A much better general warm-up would be a series of ankle rotations, knee raises, sumo squats, side lunges, and torso twists. The Achilles tendons, calves, and hip flexors are the parts we want to butter up before we skate. Activate those quads, hamstrings, adductors, and glutes. Those are the muscles that are going to be contracted while skating.

A semi-specific warm-up (yay for hyphens!) would be to stand on a balance board for five to ten minutes before skating. Get your balance all nice and centered. Focus balance, not boards. Aaron Kyro explains how to make a balance board on the dirt cheap: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kKKUfpmsGX4

I'm sure most people here already know this, but I'm going to say it anyway. I see this too often. Start your session with easy things that you can do every time: tic-tacks, manuals, nose and tail pivots, pushing, rolling, sliding. Carves, rolling grabs, kickturns, ollies. Push switch. Tic-tack switch. Do the easy stuff. Fire up those neurons!

We've all seen the aspiring hero who tries to nollie backside flip over the chain, right off the bat. And he tries it for a half-hour straight, without landing it or any other tricks. And then he gets mad, 'cause you know, "he usually has it right away." This guy sucks. This guy's stupid. Don't be him!

On the other hand, you've got somebody like Ricky Oyola. Ricky does simple tricks. Ricky does easy tricks. Plenty of people can out-trick Ricky. But what does Ricky do? He puts his tricks into lines, and he does long lines with style and ease. He's long graduated from Carl Jung's "Hero" archetype, to what Dr. Jung called the Warrior. He knows his abilities and takes calculated risks. And because of that, Ricky O is one of the most mature, consistent, bad-ass skaters in the world. Be like Ricky!
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dtotherob
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« Reply #1 on: July 28, 2013, 02:36:21 PM »

thanks tips.
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dr bail
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« Reply #2 on: September 04, 2013, 11:14:40 AM »

Sometimes I see people roll up to the park or the spot and "warm up" by doing static quad and hamstring stretches. I just want to stooge-slap them. Do we extend our quads and hamstrings when we stretch? Does skateboarding require particular flexibility of these muscles? With the exception of a stiffy or a method air, no!

Skating itself probably doesnt use those muscles so much but all the other physical activity involved does. When you are about to collide with another skater at a park or bail pretty bad, you are using the hamstring to do quick starts and stops. The act of pushing the skateboard does also use these muscles. Don't hate on someone that is just getting ready for some physical activity. Maybe they have an injury and need to do these things. Maybe they are aging and dont recover like a 19 year old. There are many reasons why its a good idea to stretch and franky you shouldnt care what other people are doing. Would you go slap Steve Alba because he is doing his yoga stretches before a session?
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GC
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« Reply #3 on: September 04, 2013, 10:03:43 PM »

I don't actually want to slap anybody. That would be absurd. That would be terrible! I just say it for dramatic effect.

Yes, the quads, glutes, and hamstrings are essential in pushing and stopping. Stretching and contracting are opposite functions, and in this case, those muscles contract. We want to fire those muscles up!! How do we simultaneously warm up and loosen our muscles? We do this with dynamic stretching. Knee raises, leg swings, ankle rolls. That sort of thing.

After the session is recovery time. Recovering from the previous session is actually the first step to preparing for the next. NOW is the time to do those slow, static stretches! The hips, quads, hamstrings, glutes, calves, and ankles are essential. Take slow, deep breaths while in any given stretch. Try to extend the stretch just a little with each breath. Once you're nice and deep in the stretch, hold it for thirty seconds. Keep breathing! Then come out slowly.

We spend a lot of time hunched over when we skate, so post-sesh is also a great time to do a bridge. Help counter all of that hunching we do. Really feel it in your upper back during your bridge. Maybe do two or three of them. After all of these stretches, you'll feel amazing!

You're all stretched! Now go home and eat some eggs.
« Last Edit: September 04, 2013, 10:06:26 PM by GC » Logged
dtotherob
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« Reply #4 on: September 05, 2013, 04:44:50 PM »

well all that is good but you forgot to mention the part where you down your protein shake and look at yourself flexing in the mirror. 

when i warm up for skating, i skate around and slowly warm up, skating. 

but thanks again, tips.
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Babe, Mr. Ruth if you're Nasty
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« Reply #5 on: September 06, 2013, 08:49:01 AM »

My back is kinda screwed up after years of doing hard labor. So I stretch that out the most, followed by knees. Just a few lunges. Skating flat is great to warm up. A few ollies and 180's and I am good.
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GC
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« Reply #6 on: September 06, 2013, 09:56:02 AM »

Totally! There are two types of warm-ups: general and specific. Things like jumping jacks, leg swings, ankle rolls, and that kind of stuff are general warm-ups. They get your blood pumping and your joints ready to skate. Then you have warm-ups specific to skating: pushing, turning, manuals, ollies, 180s -- stuff like that.

Before you go out and skate, or right before the session, even, it helps to sit down for a minute and visualize what you want to do. See it in a first-person view. Imagine how it feels to pop a nice, high ollie. Imagine it at full speed. Imagine it at twice the speed. The more you do this, the more you're going to fire up the neurons in your brain, and the better you're going to skate.

Practicing visualizations after the session helps, too. And here's a weird one: practice them just before going to bed. If you drill this stuff in your head right before you sleep, your brain is going to practice it thousands of times over while you sleep.

Stay tuned next time, when we discuss learning tricks in your dreams. Same bat time, same bat channel!
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dtotherob
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« Reply #7 on: September 06, 2013, 06:53:08 PM »

awesome tips there, skate coach. 
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