RIP IN PEACE: Jeff Grosso

Today we have the terrible task of saying a heartbreaking goodbye to beloved verticalist, commentator and friend of the mag Jeff Grosso. The Brat, Mothra, Grossman or just plain Jeff, Grosso went from number-one amateur to '80s superstar to cautionary tale and back again. His latest role as lovable curmudgeon, host of his own history-packed web series and keeper of skateboarding’s righteousness, unafraid to offend or annoy in his quest to educate, was by far his greatest—second only to being Oliver’s dad. Ripping ’til the end, he became an unlikely mentor to the generations that followed—from Muska and Tom, to Lizzie and Brighton. Jeff could be as gentle and sincere as he could be hilarious and hard (on the coping and himself). He always skated with style. His grinds were long, his backside airs were head-high and his handplants were stalled out and sadder than a funeral. He will be sorely, sorely missed. Our hearts go out to his family and many friends. RIP, Grosso. —Michael Burnett

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Watch Jeff Grosso's Love Letters to Skateboarding here.

  • Loveletters to Skateboarding: Rant and Rave

    Loveletters to Skateboarding: Rant and Rave
    Grosso sets the record straight (sort of), burns a few bridges, and calls it like he sees it.
  • Loveletters to the Backside Air

    Loveletters to the Backside Air
    Jeff Grosso starts a new season of "Loveletters to Skateboaring" by talking about the origins of the backside air with Billy Ruff, Dave Andrecht, and many others. Check it out.
  • Vans Pool Party 2015: Blog

    Vans Pool Party 2015: Blog
    Rhino comes through with some photos from the Pool Party. Check them out here.
  • Josh Borden's Surprise Party

    Josh Borden's Surprise Party
    A heavy crew assembled at Omar Hassan's backyard bowl to surprise Josh Borden on Saturday.
  • World's Best Premiere: Propeller

    World's Best Premiere: Propeller
    Apparently, it was just a rumor that Vans hired security specifically to keep Jimmy away from the premiere. He had free-range to throw his iron-grip and probing questions at every pro skater he came across.