Badbadnotgood Interview

Bad Bad Not Good Intro 750px

 

Don’t let the name fool you ’cause BadBadNotGood is quite the opposite. 
They’ve been gaining a lot of attention and praise the past few years by doing some hip-hop covers in their own jazz flavor. As people started to notice, so did other rappers and they began collaborating with such artists as Kendrick Lamar, Tyler the Creator, Danny Brown and even did a whole album with Ghostface Killah called Sour Soul. Snoop Dogg worked with them on the “Lavender” track which has a video where Snoop pulls the trigger on a Trump-inspired clown which may have gotten them some unwanted attention. They’re bringing a jazz groove to a fresh, young audience. Chester Hansen, Alex Sowinski and Leland Whitty took a few minutes to talk amidst a bombardment of selfie requests from fans. —Jordan Joseffer

What got you guys into jazz?
Chester: I got into jazz through my parents. My dad listened to a lot of jazz and then I started playing and getting into bass when I was in high school, then picked up jazz through that.
Leland: Yeah, kind of the same way for me too. My parents listened to blues and soul and stuff and a little bit of jazz. Then just kind of wanting to get better at my instrument is what led me towards jazz.
Alex: Through my drum teacher, definitely learning the technique of playing jazz. Just wanting to play better and he was trained in jazz, so that led to me wanting to learn jazz and practice and play swing music and all of these kinds of things.

Are you guys hyper critical when listening to other music? Do you hate certain structures or if something is too simple? 
Chester: I don’t think so. There’s an energy in music that you can find regardless of the technical ability of the people. It just depends on the meaning behind what they’re doing.
Alex: Yeah, there’s just parralells between good music and good vibes. Recordings of so much of different types of music have been made for so many years now and continue and people are still discovering new types of ways to blend sounds and ideas and things that move people and things that touch people, so it’s all there.

 

Bad Bad Not Good PQ 750px
What’s with the Jim Beam percussion?
Leland: There was a wood block that we use for a few songs that got lost on tour. We always drink whiskey so there’s whiskey bottles around at all times, so we just took one of those and taped it to a cymbal stand and it was the best option to replace the wood block. Well, maybe not the best but the funniest.

Are you trying to work out a deal with Jim Beam?
Leland: Yeah, that’s my dream right there.

Did you guys receive threats after the “Lavender” video dropped or did Snoop get most of the blame?
Chester: No, but our manager got some weird phone calls, weird voicemails but we were mostly okay.
Leland: We got some criticism but no threats.
Alex: And we didn’t have anything to do with the video. It was made on their creative vibe and basis.



Would you mind if Trump got shot?
Alex: That’s not really a good way to go about anything. Peaceful measures is what we need in this time.

What has been your favorite collaboration project?
Chester: The whole thing with Ghostface was amazing because we got to tour with him and do a bunch of shows. That’s probably the longest running collab that we’ve had so that’s really special. There’s been a bunch of really cool ones. Working with Mick Jenkins was amazing.

Who would be your dream collaboration?
Leland: Kenny G. I don’t know, loads of people. As far as rappers go, Noname or YG—there’s too many people.
Chester: We were hanging out with Denzel Curry last night who we’ve jammed with before and played live with before but haven’t actually written or completed an original song with. He’s a super fun guy to hang out with so that’d be cool.

Do you see similarities between the flowing nature of jazz and the flowing nature of skating?
Alex: Definitely. Just like you have such a unique style with skateboarding, the way you do your tricks, the way you use your set of skills and basic functions, which is similar to jazz where you learn certain techniques but then you develop your own ideas and the way you want to improvise and create emotions with your thoughts and feelings with your instrument. 
I think that’s very congruent with skateboarding as well as in terms of how everything comes together and then selecting the music for it 
as well to create a feeling behind what you are displaying.
Leland: Yeah, well, skateboarding is a flowing rhythmic thing too. It works really well with music, as far as skate videos go. There’s the whole thing too as far as practicing a craft. You have to put time into it, develop it and learn a lot about yourself in the process. It’s kind of similar in that way. For the record, I am not good at skateboarding.

Well, as long as you’re having fun.
Leland: Exactly.

 

 

  • The Shrine's "Born To Waste Away" Music Video

    The Shrine's "Born To Waste Away" Music Video
    The Shrine’s raw new music vid pushes back on the American Dream in LA and helps give funds to protestors for legal aid. Bump this on your next bowl session. 
  • Hacksaw Interview

    Hacksaw Interview
    Hacksaw's music is not here for your enjoyment. It exists to pummel you into submission. We caught up with these heavy noise makers, but we were particularly curious about guitarist/skater Mike Hell's perspective and ethics of eating garbage straight from the can. 
  • Cobra Man Interview

    Cobra Man Interview
    Musical act Cobra Man was conceived from the fire of skate videos but it has now grown into its own groovy, dance-music monster. The band's DNA is shared with the skate pscyhos over at Worble and their tunes are hot and heavy throughout the new vid Party Destroyer.
  • Soccer Mommy Interview

    Soccer Mommy Interview
    Blending genres of different musical eras, Sophie Allison AKA "Soccer Mommy" has crafted her own unique sound. She's a true songwriter and Atiba Jefferson had the honor of directing her latest video which, of course, involves skating.
  • Jeff Ament: Rock Stardom to Skate Philanthropy

    Jeff Ament: Rock Stardom to Skate Philanthropy
    Selling 85 million albums worldwide is quite an accomplishment. But Pearl Jam bassist Jeff Ament has another epic legacy. He has been pivotal in getting skateparks built in underserved rural areas including many Native American reservations. Here he talks about his roots in music and skating.
  • Grind and Slam in Amsterdam

    Grind and Slam in Amsterdam
    If you’re near the Netherlands this month, make sure you get over to Skatepark Noord’s Grind and Slam event for a damn good time skating and circle-pitting to Vitamin X and Kaak. Check the crucial details on the flyer and learn the 24-hour clock while you’re at it. 
  • Death Match Austin 2020

    Death Match Austin 2020
    As many of you know, on March 6th the City of Austin issued a disaster declaration, cancelling SXSW in light of concerns relating to the COVID-19 virus. As a result, the Death Match on March 19-21 has been cancelled.
  • Orville Peck Interview

    Orville Peck Interview
    The mysterious performer Orville Peck has managed to draw a dedicated following ranging from country fans, punks, pop enthusiasts and everyone in between. Writing from the heart and keeping showmanship a priority has proven to be a successful combination. We were stoked to hear he's down with the mag.
  • Flogging Molly Salty Dog Cruise

    Flogging Molly Salty Dog Cruise
    A floating punk-rock festival adrift in the high seas? Walk the plank! Flogging Molly has hosted this epic cruise several times and this year they added skating to the mix. This feature includes interviews with Steve Caballero, Matt Hensley, Pennywise, Stiff Little Fingers, and Pegboy.
  • Four AM's "Downtime" Music Video

    Four AM's "Downtime" Music Video
    Beatrice strikes through the car-lit streets of NYC in this FourAM music video directed by Giovanni Reda.